Discipline: Literature – poetry

Sara Teasdale

Discipline: Literature – poetry
MacDowell fellowships: 1925
Sara Teasdale (1884–1933) was well reviewed for lyrical poetry that centered on a woman's changing perspectives on beauty, love, and death. Many of Teasdale's poems chart developments in her own life, from her experiences as a sheltered young woman in St. Louis, to those as a successful yet increasingly uneasy writer in New York, to a depressed and disillusioned person who would eventually commit suicide. Though many later critics would not consider Teasdale a major poet, she was popular in her lifetime. She won the first Columbia Poetry Prize in 1918, a prize that would later be renamed the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. From 1904 to 1907, Teasdale was a member of The Potters, led by Lillie Rose Ernst, a group of female artists in their late teens and early twenties who published, from 1904 to 1907, The Potter's Wheel, a monthly artistic and literary magazine in St. Louis.

Studios

Sprague-Smith

Sara Teasdale worked in the Sprague-Smith studio.

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